Life Savers educate campus about suicide, mental health

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Clara Neupert

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Life Savers educate campus about suicide, mental health

The Rest Nest is on the fifth floor of the McIntyre Library. Two student-workers are present to provide an ear to listen.

The Rest Nest is on the fifth floor of the McIntyre Library. Two student-workers are present to provide an ear to listen.

© 2019 Clara Neupert

The Rest Nest is on the fifth floor of the McIntyre Library. Two student-workers are present to provide an ear to listen.

© 2019 Clara Neupert

© 2019 Clara Neupert

The Rest Nest is on the fifth floor of the McIntyre Library. Two student-workers are present to provide an ear to listen.

A new organization at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire is taking steps to address mental health and suicide among college students. The program is the Suicide Prevention and Research Collaborative, also known as SPARC.

SPARC functions as an educational resource for professors and students on campus. A group of students, called Life Savers, present information about suicide and mental health to classes. Each presentation is about 50  minutes long. Since she started working with SPARC, UW-Eau Claire Student Health Educator Christina Prust estimates 1,000 students have heard the Life Savers’ message.