Civil Conversations: Day 1, Atlanta and a Ukraine protest

    Protestors line streets in downtown Atlanta to bring attention to loss of innocence

    More stories from Allison Hinrichs

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    According a tweet made by the Ukrainian Parliament, at least 115 children have been killed and 140 have been injured in Ukraine since the start of the Russian Invasion.

    Protesters, led by the Mothers March for Ukraine, lined the Atlanta streets carrying swaddled cloths splattered with red paint during an event March 19.

    The protestors advocated for the United States government to implement a no-fly zone over Ukraine, which would subsequently make the U.S at war with Russia.

    This was the sight UW-Eau Claire students were greeted with on the first day of the Civil Rights Pilgrimage, where they will learn about the impact of the civil rights movement, when they were dropped off downtown at the CNN center.

    On March 19, protesters, led by the Mothers March for Ukraine, lined the street carrying swaddled cloths splattered with red pain. The protestors advocated for the United States government to implement a no-fly zone over Ukraine, which would subsequently make the U.S at war with Russia.

    Gennady Gyabolyab, one of the protestors, said “this is a war between good and evil and evil is targeting shelters and bombing kids.”

    According a tweet made by the Ukrainian Parliament, at least 115 children have been killed and 140 have been injured in Ukraine since the start of the Russian Invasion.

    Gyabolyab, is one of the many refugee protestors from Ukraine advocating for their families thousands of miles away across the sea.

    “We need to put pressure on businesses that are helping fund the war in Ukraine,” Gyabolyab said. “We need to boycott these businesses; we need to boycott Nestle.”

    Gyabolyab said that businesses like Nestle, who refuse to suspend operations with Russia are thereby providing a budget for the war.

    The protest follows the publishing of a tweet on March 17, by Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal, who described the CEO of Nestle, Mark Schneider, as showing, “no understanding.”

    As students stepped off the bus to experience their first Civil Rights Pilgrimage destination and to learn about the tragedies of African American prior to the Civil Rights movement they were met with the realities of today.

    The protestors handed out flyers asking locals to contact their representatives here and bring their families to safety in the U.S.

    Hinrichs can be reached [email protected]